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Are Humans Still Evolving?


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#41 Randy Reed

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 11:27 AM

View Postnavybuttons, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 10:07 AM, said:

are you suggesting that our opposable thumb isn't major, that we don't have one, that monkey's do, or that it's not our greatest asset?imo trying to assign importance of assets is silly. humans have disproportionally large male genetalia, how you gonna rate an opposable thumb or an achilles against that?i like to think our capability of complex language was the greatest contributor to neanderthal's demise. he prolly stepped to us and the trut is yall don't wanna step to dis. of course humans are still evolving, shit, we're evolving so fast we'll prolly be extinct in 75 years. fucking sweet!!!
Well, i'm not sure if the above was written in navy code but i'll try to answer. I think the achilles and the human traits that enabled us to run long distances were ultimatelymore important than the thumb in comparison. Had we not been able to run we wouldn't be here. It enabled us access to huge protien source which not only helped us survivebeen was extremely beneficial to brain developement.By developing tracking and running together helped homo sapiens to develope not only language, but imagination and complex thinking like foresight and planning which is whatreally differentiates humans from the rest of the animal population. For a couple million years we traveled as groups, men, women, children, grandparents (like nomads) following food sources. The group would set out on a "hunt" or run but couldn't simply out run faster animals, they had to track them. To track the animals they had to "think" like them. Theywould have to put themselves in the animal's place or "imagine" what their next move might be. They had to think outside the box, so to say. We also had to work in tandem and communicateas such during these hunts. Many think that we evolved the ability to aniticipate, plan and communicate, etc., was a direct result of hunting food during these runs. (Tools and weapons are onlyabout 100,000 years old as far as we can tell.) So if you think our superiority was due to complex language you might be right, but that was only a part of it and likely it was due to the fact we could run like the dickens which gave us that edge in thefirst place. As an example, let's go back to the monkey. Like I said we share 95% of the same dna. Why did we advance intellectually and they didn't? Why did our brains developed more advanced and their's didn't?Most believe it was the access to protien by eating animals where monkeys didn't. Ever see a monkey run? Know way he's a chasing a deer down with those flat feet.
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#42 Randy Reed

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 11:45 AM

I might as well add at this point that this also likely wiped out the whole "hunter/gatherer" theory that is a prevelent theory.Woman, kids and old people can run and likely did during these hunts and participated. It was unlikely they had a townor village as a base and moved along with the food source. It likely went something like the dominant men, like dear old dads starting the hunt. They were the more experience trackers. As they tired they rotated and as the group got tired the young guns would take over and renew the chase. As the chase ended the woman and older people would end it and go for the kill.It was also likely that women carried the smaller children. Ever seen a marathon where some girl has the baby in a backpack?Ever wonder why women suck in sprints compared to men but are almost equals in longer distances like ultra-marathons?
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#43 navybuttons

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:00 PM

View PostRandy Reed, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 11:27 AM, said:

(Tools and weapons are onlyabout 100,000 years old as far as we can tell.)
over 2 million years and 6 or 7 speciations off.but your understanding of many things differs so far from mine i don't know what to say. but i'll try anyway.

View PostRandy Reed, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 11:27 AM, said:

Why did we advance intellectually and they didn't? Why did our brains developed more advanced and their's didn't?
if i'm not mistaken it was when our ancestors began to become primarily bi-pedal that our brains began to develop higher and more complicated levels of pattern recognition.

View PostRandy Reed, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 11:27 AM, said:

Most believe it was the access to protien by eating animals where monkeys didn't.
meat consumption is relatively new in our evolution. i've never heard from a single source (let alone "most believe") that it was protein that allowed or triggered our brains to evolve advanced pattern recognitions.my understanding was that our ancestors first taste of meat was from the sea which, again, requires tools, and it would serve as an evolutionary trigger for more advanced ones.edit: at the time i wrote this i misunderstood "pattern recognition" to be synonymous with "intelligence."
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#44 JoeyJoJo

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:08 PM

View Postnavybuttons, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 1:00 PM, said:

but your understanding of many things differs so far from mine i don't know what to say.
Welcome to the religion forum.You know what I was thinking about the other day? Geese. I read somewhere that when geese are migrating and one of them gets hurt and has to stop, another goose will also stop with him. I thought that was nice.(I either read that or I came up with it in my head when I saw two geese on the side of the road hanging out. I can't remember. Maybe the AFLAC advertising is infiltrating my imagination.)Anyway, I don't know what that has to do with this. Is it an evolution question? Or maybe a God gave us morality question?
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#45 speedz99

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:13 PM

View PostJoeyJoJo, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 1:08 PM, said:

Anyway, I don't know what that has to do with this. Is it an evolution question? Or maybe a God gave us morality question?
Or many not even a question at all? More of a story?
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#46 JoeyJoJo

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:16 PM

View Postspeedz99, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 1:13 PM, said:

Or maybe not even a question at all? More of a story?
A valid point.Apparently geese are "permanently monogamous" (for a year; weird place to use permanent), so it's certainly possible that if one goose goes down, his or her goose spouse will stay with the fallen goose.No Goose Left Behind
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#47 El Guapo

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:23 PM

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#48 hank213

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 02:54 PM

View PostRandy Reed, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 1:45 PM, said:

I might as well add at this point that this also likely wiped out the whole "hunter/gatherer" theory that is a prevelent theory.Woman, kids and old people can run and likely did during these hunts and participated. It was unlikely they had a townor village as a base and moved along with the food source. It likely went something like the dominant men, like dear old dads starting the hunt. They were the more experience trackers. As they tired they rotated and as the group got tired the young guns would take over and renew the chase. As the chase ended the woman and older people would end it and go for the kill.It was also likely that women carried the smaller children. Ever seen a marathon where some girl has the baby in a backpack?Ever wonder why women suck in sprints compared to men but are almost equals in longer distances like ultra-marathons?
Getting fixated on the running aspect of early homo sapiens as "the key" adaptation in human evolution is rather myopic and is one of the problems with evolutionary study. Scientific study, by it's very nature, seeks to explain phenomena through a one-source approach. However, evolution does not happen in a vacuum and it is most likely a confluence of adaptions with evolutionary pressures that led to homo sapiens expansive growth.

View Postnavybuttons, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 3:00 PM, said:

if i'm not mistaken it was when our ancestors began to become primarily bi-pedal that our brains began to develop higher and more complicated levels of pattern recognition.
It's called encephalization and it is extremely important in the evolution of homo sapiens. Studying bipedalism and it's effects on the development of the brain in homo erectus and homo sapiens again falls short in its methodolgy of seeking "the silver bullet."
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#49 El Guapo

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 02:59 PM

View Posthank213, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 2:54 PM, said:

It's called encephalization and it is extremely important in the evolution of homo sapiens. Studying bipedalism and it's effects on the development of the brain in homo erectus and homo sapiens again falls short in its methodolgy of seeking "the silver bullet."
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#50 Randy Reed

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 03:11 PM

View Posthank213, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 2:54 PM, said:

Getting fixated on the running aspect of early homo sapiens as "the key" adaptation in human evolution is rather myopic and is one of the problems with evolutionary study. Scientific study, by it's very nature, seeks to explain phenomena through a one-source approach. However, evolution does not happen in a vacuum and it is most likely a confluence of adaptions with evolutionary pressures that led to homo sapiens expansive growth. It's called encephalization and it is extremely important in the evolution of homo sapiens. Studying bipedalism and it's effects on the development of the brain in homo erectus and homo sapiens again falls short in its methodolgy of seeking "the silver bullet."
I agree and given that it's a poker forum and I was bored at work, not a paleantologist I wasn't fully specific. There were obviously many factors other than running that went intoour evolution but I was just pointing out what I thought might be a little less known aspect of it that was still important.
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#51 hank213

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 03:30 PM

View PostRandy Reed, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 5:11 PM, said:

I agree and given that it's a poker forum and I was bored at work, not a paleantologist I wasn't fully specific. There were obviously many factors other than running that went intoour evolution but I was just pointing out what I thought might be a little less known aspect of it that was still important.
I thought you might be claiming that you were "hyper evolved" now that you're jogging and stuff. Had to put and end to that shit post haste.
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#52 brvheart

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 09:34 PM

View PostEl Guapo, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 3:23 PM, said:

How do you not like Ghost in the Darkness?
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#53 Randy Reed

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 11:04 AM

View Posthank213, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 3:30 PM, said:

I thought you might be claiming that you were "hyper evolved" now that you're jogging and stuff. Had to put and end to that shit post haste.
haha, no. But speaking of "hyper evolved", what advanced evolution power would you choose if you could like the Xmen powers?
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#54 hank213

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 11:49 AM

View PostRandy Reed, on Wednesday, November 11th, 2009, 1:04 PM, said:

haha, no. But speaking of "hyper evolved", what advanced evolution power would you choose if you could like the Xmen powers?
Hmmm.The regeneration, and therefore near immortality, of wolverine would be pretty awesome. Teleportation is a good one, definitely would be robbing banks with that one.Being able to read peoples thoughts would be cool at the poker table. But I'd want it to be something I had to consciously want to do, not like the chick from True Blood that constantly has to focus on blocking her telepathy. Shapeshifting would be cool.more later I actually have to work now :club:
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#55 Randy Reed

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 12:47 PM

Yeah, I have to think flying would be pretty awesome, "Honey I'm going to buzz over to Vegas, be back in a bit".I do agree some super powers like great hearing could be really annoying.
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#56 hank213

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 02:15 PM

View PostRandy Reed, on Wednesday, November 11th, 2009, 2:47 PM, said:

Yeah, I have to think flying would be pretty awesome, "Honey I'm going to buzz over to Vegas, be back in a bit".I do agree some super powers like great hearing could be really annoying.
Yeah with powers like that it's all about degree and ability to control easily.
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#57 Randy Reed

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 12:15 PM

View Posthank213, on Tuesday, November 10th, 2009, 4:30 PM, said:

I thought you might be claiming that you were "hyper evolved" now that you're jogging and stuff. Had to put and end to that shit post haste.
I was thinking about this over the weekend. I listen to audion books about 2 hours a day and usually read in the morning and before bed soI read alot. Since i've been running I happened upon alot of interesting books on the subject which I found pretty fascinating and flew in the faceof alot that I had kind of taken for granted. I hoped this kind of became an evolution type thread since I have little interest in debating Balloon Guyover this type of stuff since he doesn't believe any of it happened in the first place. So obviously it was a current topic on my mind due to the recent spate of reading on the subject. I found it pretty interesting that we were moreof a nomadic/running people than the typical hunter/gatherer that we were mostly led to believe. The evidence is pretty convincing.
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#58 Randy Reed

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 08:05 AM

Okay, I've changed my mind. I am curious, I wonder what the Neanderthals did to piss God off? I mean they were the dominant species on the planet longer than any other, longer than homo sapien even to thisday but they must have done something to piss him off and wipe them off the planet, eh?For that matter, Homo Sapiens and Neanderthals were the only two human-like beings to evolve froma common ancestor, there were others that are obviously extinct as well. But anyway, as Hank was saying and I didn't explain, running wasn't the only thing that made homo-sapienseventually the more dominant species. Somewhere during the Ice Age homosapien moved (in Africa) to the oceans edge and included lots of seafood in their diet along with fruits and veggies. Interestingly, Neanderthal throughout there existence remained meat eaters and stayed consisently the samefor close to a half million years. They had one basic tool they developed and judging from the broken bones theyconsistently had it must have been a bitch to kill wooly mammoths and saber-tooth tigers and such. So somewhere along the line something about the homo sapiens changed to make them the more dominent specieswhich was likely the diet. Homo Sapien brains became larger than Neands and we started making better weaponslike spears along with what appears to be an artistic sense and a sense of self, judging by artifacts.So anyway as the ice age receded, the homo sapiens took off across the world and wreaked havoc, killing animalsin the quest for food and causing mass extinction of large mammals on a never seen before scale. It would probablycause Greenpeace activists to commit Hari Kari. Neanders lack of ability to adapt and compete ultimately caused their demise.Well, with no food and needing about 5000 calories a day to starvation was the likely end culprit.Another thing I should note, it is probably alot more sexy to imagine that we came from a paradise called Edenand were basically created as we are today rather than picturing a group of our ancestors hordeing over a bloody carcassand gnawing on rare antelope steak. I wonder if they saved the liver for grandma and the brains for the kids or something?I guess we'll never know for sure about that stuff. Hmm, wonder why God didn't have Paul or someone put that in the bible?
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#59 vbnautilus

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 08:56 AM

By several measures, we are not the dominant species on the planet. There are estimated to be about 4 times as many chickens as humans.But beetles are by far the most populous and widespread creatures on the planet, accounting for about 25% of all life forms.

#60 Randy Reed

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 09:04 AM

View Postvbnautilus, on Thursday, November 19th, 2009, 8:56 AM, said:

By several measures, we are not the dominant species on the planet. There are estimated to be about 4 times as many chickens as humans.But beetles are by far the most populous and widespread creatures on the planet, accounting for about 25% of all life forms.
I guess I meant that we can kick some beetle ass for being a less dominant species. I think. Are you saying the Beetle God is more powerful than OURS?
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