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#21 LadyGrey

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 05:54 AM

View PostAmScray, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 3:27 AM, said:

What are the Guards Like? For the most part, total retards. Prison Guard is a profession that scrapes the absolute bottom of societies barrel. You're more likely to find a generally higher caliber man amongst the inmates than you are amongst the guards. There are exceptions to this, but for the most part, they're people who wouldn't be qualified to be assistant manager at a fast food place.
My mum's boyfriend's daughter's husband (my brother-not-in-law?) is a prison guard in England. He works in a women's prison and they are all crazy about him because he is good looking and young. I think he is a nice guy, but I am sure a different breed works in men's prisons.Very interesting post by the way. I am curious about what 'luxuries' those in prison are afforded. You often hear about how prisoners have it 'better off' than a lot of everyday people because they have a ton of pool tables and TVs etc. I think that with that many people locked up you need to entertain them somehow or they will get pissy, but at the same time when you hear how much it costs the taxpayer, you start to think it's messed up to treat criminals so well. What's your view as someone who has seen both sides? What kind of games, electronics etc are you guys given, and do you think it's enough/too much/necessary etc?
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#22 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:11 AM

View PostGiggidy, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 6:25 AM, said:

Was it a case of if someone was perceived weak/easy target they were picked on more?What was the biggest change to yourself from before/after being inside?
The weak are definitely preyed on more. The weakest usually tap out and do the heavy religious thing with inmate ministry or check in to protective custody. Prison is definitely full of predatory type personalities, which is a large part of the reason that I say I would take a poker team made of high IQ prisoners over a poker team made up of Ivy League scholars any day. Occasionally, someone wound up in there who was totally outside of the "inmate norm" and had very little 'street smarts' to work with. Usually, your upper-middle class white kids who sold a bit too much weed during college, your regular 'average Joe' type guys who got tagged with a DUI injury/manslaughter case... There are definitely two sides to life; most prisoners were born into the ugly side of life and just continued living it. It's a side of life that regular people won't ever see or remotely understand, but should they ever find themselves in prison, they're forced to learn how to deal with the more unfortunate aspects of human nature whether they like it or not. My time definitely had an impact on me.While I've never really been a criminal type, I've never been naive about much, either. Asking a person with a normal upbringing who has been living an otherwise normal life to enter that environment will be a huge shock to their perception of life. I came from very little, was raised in a shitty neighborhood, "heard gunshots" as a kid, learned from an early age about people and how they are prone to behave in certain situations, etc, so getting by in the joint was simply an extension of that. Still, no matter where or what you may come from, you can't leave a place like that without it having some kind of an impact. My greatest personal strength has always been my adaptability, so it served me damn well in there. Still, after release, adaptability can often devolve into complacency, as you perpetually adapt to the next lower rung on your way down the ladder. You will often find that the lowest people in society (prisoners, people in trailer parks, people in ghettos) are usually the most "adaptable" people, since their complete lack of standards allows them to comfortably accept whatever miserable situation they're in. After I did my time, I had to work very, very hard to resist this and keep moving upwards. I came from the bottom, worked my way out and was sent right back to the bottom again, so I have to fight the natural urge is to just remain there; once you've seen that elephant, you realize how totally trivial and over-emphasized many things are. I've struggled to keep things in perspective and remain upwardly mobile as a result of my time- at times, everything seems pointless, but I'm doing OK at this time. It could all change tomorrow.
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#23 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:17 AM

View PostLadyGrey, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 6:54 AM, said:

Very interesting post by the way. I am curious about what 'luxuries' those in prison are afforded. You often hear about how prisoners have it 'better off' than a lot of everyday people because they have a ton of pool tables and TVs etc. I think that with that many people locked up you need to entertain them somehow or they will get pissy, but at the same time when you hear how much it costs the taxpayer, you start to think it's messed up to treat criminals so well. What's your view as someone who has seen both sides? What kind of games, electronics etc are you guys given, and do you think it's enough/too much/necessary etc?
Myth busted. Here in the US, the concept of "easy" prisons is a complete lie. There is no such thing- not even Federal Prison camps (which many moons ago, had isolated examples where inmates were afforded luxuries, but those days are long, long gone)If one thinks the presence of a TV means that someone in prison "has it better" than someone on the outside, ask yourself if you would trade spots with them? Of course, inmates have to be afforded things to keep their minds busy- a basketball hoop or a foosball table isn't exactly seating them in the lap of luxury. Anyone who thinks otherwise is being totally unrealistic. There are people out there who believe that anything short of World War II Japanese Internment Camp style is being "too kind". Those people are retards. There are no electronics. You can't have IPODS, cel phones, internet, video games, etc. I don't know of any institution- state or federal- that allows those things (the FED has a limited system called TRULINCS where inmates can send controlled and monitored text only emails, but no internet browsing, etc) Anyway, no, I'm unaware of any prison where criminals are "treated well". Reports of that stuff in the media is usually bullshit hysteria that has no basis in reality whatsoever. It may be different in the UK, however, as you guys have a totally different philosophy about criminal justice. We used to have a similar philosophy but ditched it in the 60's in favor of a less considerate, harsher principle and as a result, we now incarcerate more people per capita than any other nation on earth.
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#24 LongLiveYorke

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:17 AM

Were you or anyone there allowed to use the internet?Did you get newspapers or magazines of any sort on a regular and current basis?How did you have access to books?Are there conjugal visits?

#25 Sal Paradise

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:20 AM

View PostLongLiveYorke, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 10:17 AM, said:

Are there conjugal visits?
in these conjugal visits, you can have sex with women?
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#26 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:38 AM

View PostLongLiveYorke, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 7:17 AM, said:

Were you or anyone there allowed to use the internet?Did you get newspapers or magazines of any sort on a regular and current basis?How did you have access to books?Are there conjugal visits?
No interwebz, newspapers and magazines were OK as long as they didn't contain any prohibited content. I got Wall Street Journal, Mother Earth News and Time while I was in. The library was OK but not great. Family could order new paperbacks off Amazon and have them sent to you, but they had to be new. Some institutions allow family to send in books themselves, mine didn't. They had to be brand new and packaged from an online retailer. When I left, I donated all by books to the library except a couple. Flagrant displays of literacy weren't always the best thing in there... No conjugal visits. A very few institutions have a trustee system where they allow select inmates to have private family visits between husband and wife in on-site "houses" where they could conceivably get it on if they wanted to. Mine didn't- such arrangements are pretty rare anymore. Only a handful of institutions in the US still allow that which really is a shame, as fostering a healthy family relationship while incarcerated is very conducive to post release success.
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#27 donk4life

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:44 AM

View PostSal Paradise, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 9:20 AM, said:

in these conjugal visits, you can have sex with women?
Jerry, I've found something better than conjugal visit sex... FUGITIVE SEX!

View Postakashenk, on 02 August 2012 - 06:44 AM, said:

I don't mind folding out hands we beat.

#28 CBass1724

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:52 AM

How, when, where, and possibly with whom did you relieve your backed up plumbing?

#29 jeff_536

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 07:11 AM

I'm curious as to your opinions on Capital punishment and whether or not your incarceration changed your view either way.
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#30 sandwedge

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 07:22 AM

View PostAmScray, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 8:24 AM, said:

I'll just say that I made a carefully premeditated decision to physically hurt someone very badly and I did.
It sounds like you had a good reason to do what you did. If you could go back in time, would you handle it the same way?


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#31 donk4life

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 07:26 AM

Is prison really as segregated as TV portrays?

View Postakashenk, on 02 August 2012 - 06:44 AM, said:

I don't mind folding out hands we beat.

#32 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 07:37 AM

Quote

I'm curious as to your opinions on Capital punishment and whether or not your incarceration changed your view either way.
I was 100% in favor of it when I went in, 10,000% in favor of it when I got out. With that said, I am now only in favor of it in circumstances that are clear-cut, non-circumstantial and not predicated on lone eye-witness testimony without other corroborating evidence.Prison is unique in that you simultaneously gain a keen understanding of the massive failings and importance of "the system". I believe that deep reforms need to take place- mainly on the legislative side, also with the prisons themselves- but yeah, for sure, there are people who are just sick animals and need to be put down. It's pretty rare to encounter such people in real life, but they're common in prisons.

Quote

It sounds like you had a good reason to do what you did. If you could go back in time, would you handle it the same way?
I'm not sure. It varies from day to day. Sometimes, when I get those mass emails from friends showing hunting trips or shooting matches that I can't participate in anymore, I miss it a lot. When I'm experiencing severe variance in poker (like right now), I do think "Shit, maybe a Joe job wouldn't be such a bad thing..." Overall, it just depends on the day. I wish the whole thing hadn't ever happened, but it resulted from a circumstance that, at minimum, was "understandable". It isn't like I just attacked some random person on the street. I had clear and understandable motivation for doing what I did, even if maybe I did go too far in doing it.

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Is prison really as segregated as TV portrays?
Yes, most definitely. Race is pretty much the initial consideration for any interaction you have with other inmates, which wasn't a big deal for me as I avoid dealing with non-whites anyway. I had a great deal of exposure to 'certain minorities' prior to going in- that experience served me very well as far as understanding how I had to conduct myself with them, but the experience also served to alloy my opinions on race even further. That's one aspect that I don't want to get into too much due to the sensitivities that exist on the issue and my general intent to keep this a serious thread, but yes. Race is very much a 'big deal'.
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#33 LongLiveYorke

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:19 AM

So, just to clarify, are there any circumstances where you could listen to music of your choosing?

#34 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:21 AM

View PostLongLiveYorke, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 9:19 AM, said:

So, just to clarify, are there any circumstances where you could listen to music of your choosing?
AM/FM Radios with earbuds were available from the canteen, that's it. No MP3, tapes, CD or the like. I made extensive use of mine. Radio was pretty critical, as it allowed you a line to the outside world.
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#35 Royal_Tour

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:30 AM

wow. u got screwed on that judgment.maybe its the US state u live in?? better lawyer next time?



#36 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:33 AM

View PostRoyal_Tour, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 9:30 AM, said:

wow. u got screwed on that judgment.maybe its the US state u live in?? better lawyer next time?
Well, I blinded him in one eye (amongst other things)... The ADA wanted much, much more than what I got, but there were a lot of mitigating factors, mainly the fact that he instigated it, trying to play tough guy and "daring" me to try him. I called.Have you ever thought/said:"Man, if anyone ever (insert degrading/debasing/harmful act here) against my (insert loved one here), I would (insert severe repercussion here)!"I transferred thought into action.
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#37 Royal_Tour

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:35 AM

View PostAmScray, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 9:33 AM, said:

Well, I blinded him in one eye (amongst other things)... The ADA wanted much, much more than what I got, but there were a lot of mitigating factors, mainly the fact that he instigated it and effectively tried to play tough guy and "dared" me to do it. I called, he turned over 7/2.
and you were how old?



#38 AmScray

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:41 AM

View PostRoyal_Tour, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 9:35 AM, said:

and you were how old?
Early 20's.
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#39 Royal_Tour

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:49 AM

View PostAmScray, on Thursday, September 11th, 2008, 9:41 AM, said:

Early 20's.
im curious to know the story now.I am from a large group of friends who are hockey players with a lot of fight and/or beat down stories.unfortunately one guy i knew from highschool beat up a kid at a bush party, the kid fell and hit his head on a rock during the fight, knocking him out, and te guy kept smashing his face... besides the obvious disgusting nature of beating up an unconsious person, the kid died from a brain hemorrhage.The way you describe the nature of your issue and buddy "deserving it" i'm lead to believe he either did something to a g.f. of yours, a sister perhaps. something that aggrivated you enough to threaten him. he threatened back saying Bring it on then.and you attacked him, possibly with weapons of some kind, maybe a glass bottle if this happened at a party. or a bat if this was a assigned meet up.



#40 LadyGrey

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:52 AM

I think this is probably one of the best threads ever on FCP.There are so many different approaches to prison, especially when it comes to the rehabilitation vs punishment and all the different methods. I would like to see a brief (or detailed if you feel so inclined) comment on each of these ideas:1. Prisoners are criminals, and should be made to work in order to pay for their keep in prison. They should be forced to do manual labour or some other productive work every day as if it were their job. This would benefit the community and society, prevent the view of prison as a 'free ride', and stop inmates from wasting their time in prison.2. Criminals often turn to crime due to a disadvantaged background, and as such they need to learn during their time in prison, so that when they are released they will have a better chance at gainful employment, as well as a better understanding of the world. They should be forced to attend classes, or complete correspondence courses in order to obtain certificates of higher education, be it a High School Diploma, College Degree, or a specialised course. I am not sure what the reality is like - do inmates have opportunities to improve their education, or to work some kind of job whilst in prison? If not, what do they do all day, just read, exercise and socialise?
We are all so complicated, and then we die. We are a subject one day, with our vanities, our loves, our worries, and then one day, abruptly, we become nothing but an object, an absolutely disgusting pile of shit. We pass very quickly from one stage to the next. It's very bizarre. It will happen to all of us, and fairly soon too. We become an object you can handle like a stone, but a stone that was someone.
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